Lusting for Wine: A Dude’s (Or Lady’s) Guide to Wine-Smarts Part IV

With the base knowledge you have learned in the past 3 editions of Lusting for Wine, you are now ready to venture out into the world, fair reader, and fall in love with wine all over again. It seems fairly obvious, but the only way to truly learn more about wine is to drink wineIn the same way you can’t perfect an athletic skill without rigorous practice, you cannot truly appreciate wine or become wine-smart without spending time wine tasting at a winery. Very few people are born with a palate strong enough to fully appreciate the subtlety in great wine. This has to be developed over time with multiple wine tasting experiences. So with that in mind, here are some simple rules (guidelines) for getting the most out of your wine tasting experience.

Part 4: Rules for wine tasting

Rule #1: You do not talk about wine tasting.

Just kidding. Couldn’t resist.

Rule #1: There are no rules. Don’t buy into the hoity toity crap reputation that surrounds wine tasting. Yeah, I said it. Wine tasting is fun. You know why? Because you get to drink. Wine. A lot of it. Whatever snobby reputation wine tasting used to have is going out the window. Wine tasting isn’t for wine snobs. Screw those guys. Wine tasting is for everyone. It’s like a fun and inexpensive treasure hunt where instead of finding gold at the end, you find delicious wine. And then drink it. When you are out wine tasting remember that the goal is to have fun and discover new experiences. There are no rules.

vista-2

Rule #2: Make wine tasting a complete experience. Millennials get it. Millennials don’t buy products, they buy experiences. Wine tasting isn’t just about the wine. It’s about the adventure. Pack a picnic, load up your friends, and head out to wine country. Chances are, the wineries you will experience will be in some very beautiful locations in quiet tucked away corners. Take in the views. Wineries and vineyards are some of the only agricultural businesses where you can explore the property at-will and make yourself right at home. Most wineries play up this aspect. They feel like quiet little cottages. This is why so many people get married at wineries. Some even have bocci ball or volleyball courts for anyone to use. Taste some new wine, buy a bottle you like, then spread out your picnic and relax the day away with friends.

winery-sign

Rule #3: Plan ahead and stay safe. There are ways to do wine tasting right. When you are in wine country, find a map of the local wineries either in your hotel or online. Take suggestions from locals (the best way is to go out to a nice dinner  your first night in town and ask your server or bartender for winery recommendations). Once you have planned the wineries you want to taste, literally map them out, as in find them on a map and plot your route. You do this for two reasons: one, many wineries are tiny little cottages in the middle of nowhere and are often difficult to find. Some will require you to look for an extremely tiny sign pointing to a dirt road that you have to travel on for 2 miles before you get the goods. This is where the treasure hunt aspect comes in. Finding hidden wineries is one of the most exciting aspects of wine tasting. Second, if you are driving yourselves ALWAYS designate a sober driver. If you must all participate in tasting, start with the winery furthest away from your lodging and then work your way back, so you are closest to home at the end of your day; however, Lust for Cooking always recommends designating a sober driver or getting a cab. Wine country will also often feature wine tasting tours or drivers for hire.

winery-truck

Rule #4: Learn the proper way to taste. Not for snobbery, but because if you follow the correct sequence you will get the most out of each wine you taste and will make a more informed decision on which bottle to purchase. Don’t worry, it’s not complicated. When you arrive in the tasting room the staff will hand you a menu listing everything they have available to taste. Typically you will pay around $10 for 5 tastes although this will vary. Most wineries will comp your tasting if you buy a bottle after, but don’t demand this. Tastings will come in flights which just means the group of wines the tasting room has paired together in a certain order. Flights will always go in order from white to red and light bodied to full bodied. Some will end with a fortified wine like port. This is because when you are tasting multiple different wines together you run the risk of destroying your palate by tasting a heavy wine first. They will also likely have bland crackers out for this reason. Take a bite of cracker after each taste to restore your palate. Tastes will be 2 oz.

  1. Examine the wine’s color and appearance. Young wines will look more watery especially around the edges. High quality wines will have vibrant colors, whereas wines past their prime will be dull and murky. If you tilt your glass a ways and then stand it back up straight you may notice clear streaks running down the sides. These are called legs. Contrary to popular belief, they don’t mean anything.
  2. Stick your nose in the glass. Go ahead, do it. Wine glasses tilt inwards at the top to control the release of gasses from the wine. You can’t really get a sense of the aroma from outside the glass, and tasting glasses will typically be large enough to accommodate your face. So stick your nose in and take a big whiff. Try to describe to yourself what the wine smells like. Swirl the wine around quickly in your glass to add more oxygen, then smell again. Notice if anything has changed.
  3. Taste the damn thing. Take a sip. Describe to yourself what it tastes like. Different flavors that pop up are called notes. Notes indicate the complexity of the wine and will vary person to person depending on what your brain experiences. Winemakers don’t manipulate tasting notes; they don’t add in strawberry juice to make the wine taste like strawberries, (or snozberries), etc. There are no right notes, but often multiple people will taste the same thing in a strong complex wine. Take another sip and swirl the wine to every corner of your mouth. See if the flavor expands.
  4. Swallow. Or don’t. There are no rules. I like the full experience so I almost always swallow each taste. But if you are the sober driver, or you are reaching your limit, go ahead and spit the wine out in the spittoons on the counter. Then dump out any excess wine in your glass that you don’t want in the spittoon.

wine-swirl

Rule #5: Learn some terminology. Each wine will have different characteristics on a scale that you can judge by tasting. There are four big ones to look out for:

Acidity: PH level of the wine. More acid will cause a pucker effect like sucking on a lemon.

Tannins: Red wine gets red from the winemaker leaving grape seeds and skins in the juice during fermentation. The chemicals released from this process are called tannins which make the wine a darker red the longer it sits. Highly tannic wine will make your mouth dry.

Body: Also called mouth-feel. This is the degree to which the wine feels like water or syrup in your mouth. Fuller bodied wines linger longer.

Sweetness: As mentioned earlier, wine is made by fermenting grape juice with yeast to turn sugar into alcohol. Wines with more alcohol will be dry (not sweet) because the yeast ate all the sugar. To make a sweet wine, the winemaker will chill the wine at the right moment to cut off fermentation before the yeast is finished. This will leave some sugar behind. Try not to confuse a fruity tasting wine with a sweet wine. Dry wines will often have a sweet fruity taste, but that doesn’t mean there is actual residual sugar. Experience will help you tell the difference.

Rule #6: Have a life changing moment. Always remember the point of wine tasting: to drink a wine you have never tasted before right from the source. Wine tasting is designed to expand your knowledge of a winery you are familiar with, or expose you to a winery and to wine you never thought possible. Every mind blowing experience I have ever had with wine has been at a winery. Always take a winemaker’s recommendation and don’t be shy about exploring wine through all your senses. The sensuality of wine is most perfected when you can talk to the person that made it, see where it is made, and drink it while enjoying a sunset holding hands with the person(s) you love. There may be nothing better in life.

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Lusting for Wine: A Dude’s (Or Lady’s) Guide to Wine-Smarts Part II

So last time on Lusting for Wine, we discussed how to read a label when picking out a wine (here). And you’re like, “Well that’s all well and good: vintages, wineries, appellations, alcohol…varietal? How the hell are you supposed to read the label and pick out a great wine if you don’t know anything about the grape you are drinking?”

Part 2: Varietals

We discussed in the last post how American wineries most often bottle wine by a single varietal instead of by region, which is the European tradition. Here are the characteristics of some of the most popular varietals that you will see being sold in American grocery stores and restaurants. Remember, to put a single varietal on the label, that bottle must contain at least 75% of the juice of that varietal. Anything less than 75% of single varietal and the bottle is considered a “blend” of different varietals.

Cabernet Sauvignon: Arguably the world’s most popular grape, “Cabs” are prolific. A hybrid offspring of Cabernet Franc and Sauvignon Blanc grapes, Cabernet Sauvignon can grow in just about any climate. Sauvignon is French for savage, at that is pretty appropriate for this powerful varietal. Cabs are full bodied, dry, tanic, and almost always good no matter where they come from. Cabs are also one of the best aging grapes. Pairs best with grilled meat.

Pinot NoirAlmost nobody but serious wine enthusiasts gave a rat’s ass about Pinot Noir until the release of the movie Sideways. The movie created so much demand for Pinot Noir, wineries actually started selling too much, diluting the market with bottles that weren’t ready and almost destroying the integrity of this beautiful grape. Pinot is the opposite of Cab: delicate and extremely hard to grow. Pinot Noir is medium bodied and SUBTLE. It can only grow in climates with hot days and very cool, foggy nights, making it ideal for coastal vineyards in California (Santa Barbara, Monterey, Paso Robles). If cultivated correctly, Pinot can deliver a life-changing wine drinking experience. If the winemaker or vintner isn’t careful, Pinot can be mediocre. Pinot is also the primary varietal used to make sparkling wine. Pairs well with classic french dishes like beef bourgogne.

white-grapes

Chardonnay: The most popular white wine, Chardonnay is a close relative of the Pinot family. In fact, Pinot Blanc is so similar to Chardonnay it took DNA testing to reveal they were actually different grapes. As such, choose Chardonnays that grow in Pinot regions (hot days, cool nights). Chardonnay is one of the only white wines that traditionally goes through secondary malolactic fermentation during production, a process that can cause a “buttery” flavor. Chardonnay is dry and crisp, and can be very fruity and refreshing. Also, because Chardonnay is still typically aged in oak barrels like red wine, it can have an “oaky” flavor that other white wines which are aged in stainless steel barrels (a current trend) will not have. Also used in sparkling wine. Pairs best with poultry.

MerlotMerlot gets a bad rap from hipster wine tasters, many of whom are persuaded again by the movie Sideways (after the movie Pinot sales skyrocketed and Merlot sales tanked), because it is accessible for new and inexperienced wine drinkers. Merlot is medium bodied and easy to drink with subtle floral flavors. The truth is: a Merlot in the hands of a great winemaker can be an unbelievably beautiful and satisfying experience. Don’t be a snob about it. From the same region in France as Cabernet. Pairs well with pasta with a red sauce.

Zinfandel: Another wine that hipsters decry because it is popular with new wine drinkers due to accessibility (spawning several awful pun-based labels like “Seven Deadly Zins”). Zinfandel is actually one of the world’s great grapes. Called Primitivo in Italy, Zinfandel grows best in very hot climates. Check out Zinfandels from Lodi in California. It comes in two types: dry and spicy, or fruity to the point of being jammy. Like Merlot, a great Zin will surprise and blow you away. One of the few varietals that does best without much aging. Drink Zin with a grilled burger or fried chicken.

SyrahCalled Shiraz in Australia, Syrah is another French grape that spans the world. Syrah is full bodied and does well in intense heat. Don’t confuse Syrah with Petite Sirah, which is a completely different grape. Syrah ages extremely well and won’t disappoint a wine drinker looking for bold, intense flavor. Pairs well with grilled red meat and pork.

Sauvignon BlancI heard an experienced wine drinker once say the world has two types of people: Chardonnay drinkers, and Sauvignon Blanc drinkers. The other white wine, “Sav Blanc” is a parent of Cabernet Savignon, and can grow all over the world. Soft and citrus-y, Sav Blanc typically finishes very clean, which contrasts it to the buttery or oaky finish of Chardonnay. Pairs well with shellfish and cheese.

MalbecMalbec means “bad break” in French. Once the principal grape to blend with Cabernet Sauvignon, Malbec was replaced by Merlot. Shunned by proper French society, Malbec found a new home in South America. Malbec from the Mendoza region in Argentina is now one of the world’s most exciting varietals. Apart from rooting for the underdog, Malbec enthusiasts love its velvety blackberry notes, and the fact that it is now the mascot of South American wines which are continually gaining more and more respect around the world. Pair Malbec with Mexican food or any spicy chili dish. 

purple-grapes

Carmenere: Speaking of South America. Carmenere is the legendary “lost grape.” Pliny the Elder wrote about Carmenere in the first century A.D. It was once a proud and ancient French varietal, until it was hit by a grape destroying plague called phylloxera in the nineteenth century and was wiped out. French vintners assumed Carmenere was extinct, and it disappeared for the next century. And then out of nowhere, Carmenere was discovered growing in Chile in 1994. DNA testing revealed that a group of European immigrants had planted Carmenere in Chili in the late nineteenth century thinking it was Merlot. It was fruitful and multiplied in its new South American home. The flagship grape of Chile, Carmenere is medium bodied and earthy, and pairs well with steak or empañadas.

Sangiovese: If you want to delve into the complex world of Italian wines with your friends, invariably you will spend the vast majority of your time talking about Sangiovese. The flagship grape of Tuscany, Sangiovese is the primary varietal used in Chianti. Sangiovese is the quintessential Italian wine drinking experience. It tastes like your grand mother’s spaghetti and meatball dinner put into a blender and made into wine. If you are out wine tasting and hear the winemaker mention a “Super Tuscan,” don’t expect to see a mustachio’d Italian superhero swoop in and swoon your girlfriend. It’s actually a Sangiovese blended with certain French grapes. More on that later. Drink Sangiovese with a pizza right out of the oven, or with any tomato-based pasta.

Pinot Gris/Pinot Grigio: Yet another variety of Pinot, Pinot Gris originated in France but hit world fame in Italy known as Pinot Grigio. Rich and tart with a smooth finish, Grigio can easily hold its own against other more popular white varietals. Chill a bottle of Grigio and head to the beach on a hot day; you won’t be disappointed. Pairs best with risotto and white-sauced pasta dishes.

Riesling: The prince of German wines, Riesling is a white wine commonly drank with dessert due to its high potential for sweetness. Riesling is gaining in popularity in the United States, and American Riesling drinkers are discovering how complex it can actually be. Also, holy aging, Batman. Riesling can succeed for multiple decades. Pairs best with after-dinner sweets, but also try it with oysters or cold shrimp.

Tempranillo: What Sangiovese is to Italian wine, Tempranillo is to Spanish wine. The principal grape in “Rioja” blends, Tempranillo is the ever present native Spaniard. Tempranillo ages well and can range from medium to full bodied. Tempranillo means “early” in Spanish, and was so named because it is harvested before Garnacha. Pairs well with tapas, olives, and lamb.

Garnacha/Grenache: One of the most underrated varietals in the world, Garnacha originated in Spain and found a home in the Rhone region of France with its blending partner Syrah, where it became known as Grenache. On its own, Grenache is incredibly complex, sporting great spice and seemingly impossible layers of flavor. Blended with Syrah in “Rhone” blends, Grenache becomes a powerhouse. Buy a Rhone whenever you see one and try for yourself. It is also sometimes called a “GSM” in America, due to the blend of Grenache, Syrah, and the third Rhone child, Mourvedre. Try pairing Grenache with ribs.

This only scratches the surface of the world’s vast variety of varietals. You could write an essay about each of these. But, as I said from the beginning, I don’t intend to make you an expert, only to make you know what the hell you are talking about. Don’t ever let anyone tell you one varietal is superior to another. Every varietal has the potential for greatness. As wine is a living thing: imperfect, tempestuous, stubborn, beautiful, complex, sensual… it is also impacted by the living imperfect human beings that produce it. Every wine has the potential to excel, or fall short. Find a varietal that speaks to you and stay loyal to it. Then switch and try something else. The world is made better by diversity. This is also true in wine.

A Note on Red vs. White: Inexperienced wine drinkers pick a wine color like they’re picking a team. “I’m a red wine drinker/I only drink white wine.” The more you wine taste the more you realize: red or white is the least important aspect. Red wines vary so drastically, one red is as distinct to another red as it is to white. White wines can be as complex and powerful as the best Pinot Noir. If you’re just sitting around drinking wine, drink whatever color you are in the mood for. If you’re having wine with dinner, then you do want to be specific because certain wines do pair better with certain foods. Here’s a very loose guide: White meat/White Sauce/White Wine. Red Meat/Red Sauce/Red Wine.

For more quick reads on these grapes and more, check out these awesome flashcards, Vinifera: The World’s Great Wine Grapes and Their Stories.

More delicious wine knowledge to come. Stay tuned to Lust for Cooking.

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Lusting for Wine: A Dude’s (or Lady’s) Guide to Wine Smarts – Part 1

There are certain things you need to know in life to be a successful and functioning adult human: how to change a tire, how to play poker, how to do laundry, how to handle your finances, basic cooking skills (lustforcooking.com!), AND, basic knowledge of liquor and wine. This blog series is about wine. You don’t have to be a sommelier (sommeli-what?) to appreciate amazing wine. Unlike distilled liquors and beer which are designed to taste exactly the same with every single bottle you buy, every wine bottle is distinct. Not just every different wine label or different vintage; every single bottle tastes, smells, looks, and feels different. This is because wine is a living thing. Millennials drink more wine than any other generation. They are changing the wine industry and how wine is sold. If you want to keep up, keep reading. 

So if you love wine but still buy bottles based on the picture on the label, then this is the blog for you. I’m not going to make you an expert or a snob, but I will make you wine-intelligent. In the next few posts I will give you enough wine knowledge to understand how to read a label, how to order, what makes a bottle good (or awful), which grapes are which and how they behave, how to taste wine, how wine is made, and provide just enough lingo to make sure you never sound like a jackass while out at a nice restaurant with your lady (or dude or whatever).

So you’re like, “Hey Dude, that’s all fancy and stuff, but I just want to know how to pick out a bottle to impress my date tonight.” Not. A. Problem.

Part 1: How to read a wine label.

Buying wine based on the pretty picture or clever name on the label is like buying a beer because the beer can turns blue when it’s cold.  Wine label scribblings may seem random, but they actually contain key info that wine-intelligent people will examine to determine whether the wine is worth purchasing. And that is key. Wine is investment. Some investments go bad. Think of the label as the stock portfolio. Don’t be afraid to examine it and make a calculated risk. Here’s a basic label:

aardvark-wine-label-1Please don’t sue me if you work for Aardvark. This is just an example. In this example, the label is giving you five (5) pieces of information:

Winery: Aardvark. This is the company that produces the wine. To be clear, wineries don’t necessarily grow or pick grapes. Many wineries don’t grow grapes. Wineries take grapes, most often grown by someone else, and produce wine with them. The best wineries are small and family owned, many going back multiple generations. “Bad” wineries are large corporate models that buy up small producers and sell cheap bottles en masse. Look up the winery you are buying from. It doesn’t take 1,000 employees to produce wine. The best wine typically comes from one lady (or dude) with her/his hands stained purple from playing with grapes all day.

Vintage: 2000. This is the year the grapes were harvested, meaning picked off the vine, not the year the wine was bottled or the year the bottle was released. Grapes typically grow from May to August of each year and they are generally harvested in September (with variations based on grape and location). The vintage is important, because weather greatly affects the process of growing grapes. Some years have better weather for grapes than others, and this will affect the quality of the wine. That’s what they mean by a “good year” or a “bad year.” In order to state the vintage, 95% of the juice used must be from that year’s harvest. Like scotch, wine gets better with age, but unlike scotch, wine peaks and eventually decays in the bottle. A rule of thumb is 2 to 10 years. You don’t really want a wine with a vintage less than 2 years ago. At 5-10 years you are almost guaranteed an amazing experience (depending on the grape), for an amazingly high price. After 10 years you are pushing your luck. More on how wines are aged in later posts. A trend as of this writing is un-aged, “natural”  wines that are bottled and sold the same year they are harvested. Some producers probably do this extremely well, basically making Welch’s grape juice with alcohol (please don’t sue me Welch’s). But if you sense my sarcasm, it is because I believe the best wines mature in flavor with aging. Don’t be afraid of dust on the bottle.

Varietal: Pinot Noir. In wine lingo, “varietal” is a type of grape that has been made into wine. “Variety” is a type of grape still on the vine. This label is telling you that this bottle contains the varietal Pinot Noir that was harvested in the year 2000. In order for the winery to put a single varietal on the label, the bottle must contain at least 75% of that varietal. This is important, taken with the vintage, because some varieties do better in certain years. More on characteristics of varietals later. Different varietals age differently, and most importantly, taste different. Speaking of characteristics, American wines are categorized by varietal. In fact, this is a uniquely American concept. European wines are always based on region with multiple varietals from that region blended in each bottle. More on that later.

Appellation: Carneros. Napa Valley. This is the location the variety was grown. There are actual laws that govern which regions can call themselves an appellation. Different appellations typically specialize in different varieties based on their climate. This label is telling you that this bottle contains Pinot Noir grapes, harvested in the year 2000, from the Carneros Appellation in Napa Valley, California. In order to put an appellation on the bottle, the bottle must contain at least 85% of its juice from varieties in that appellation (if it just says the state, then 100% must be from that state). Certain labels may get even more specific and state that the bottle contains varietals not just from a single appellation, but from a single vineyard. This isn’t necessarily good or bad. After all that vineyard may contain horrible soil and grow crappy grapes. But what the winery is trying to tell you is that all the grapes come from the same soil, good or bad. Wine-intelligent people are obsessed with terroir, a word that means the differing characteristics of varieties that come from the specific soil in which they are grown. More on terroir later.

Alcohol Content: 13.8% by volume. Now the fun stuff. American wineries are required by law to put the alcohol content on the bottle. Wines range from 10% to 15%. This isn’t just a measurement of fun you’ll have after drinking the wine. It’s actually a clue as to the wine’s flavor. Wine is made by breaking down sugars in grape juice with yeast to make alcohol. The more alcohol a bottle contains, the less sugar. This means that dry (not sweet) wines will have a higher alcohol content than sweet wines. There are exceptions to this. More on how wine is made later.

Let’s briefly look at another label:

caymus-wine-label-1

Apart from displaying a Caymus label as a not so subtle advertisement for an incredibly great winery (seriously) take a look at this label applying your new knowledge. Notice anything? No vintage right? That probably means that this bottle contains grape juice from multiple vintages. Not a bad thing. The label is telling you this bottle is Cabernet Sauvignon from multiple vintages produced by Caymus. Notice anything else? What the hell does “Estate Bottled” mean? In wine parlance, this means the winery (Caymus…delicious) grows its own grapes, and the wine in this bottle comes from grapes grown on the Caymus Estate.

A note on price: I’m deviating a bit here because the price won’t be on the label, but the heart of this post is how to pick out a bottle, and the price is crucial. Price of the bottle depends on many factors, including where you buy it. Wine is always cheapest in the grocery store. You can buy perfectly fine wine in the grocery store for as little as $10, but if you want to get serious, a good beginning price point is in the $15 to $30 range. An individual’s price point depends on experience (and, yes, funds). It’s true that the more you taste, the more expensive your taste will become. Not because you become a snob (hopefully), but because wine is subtle. Without a lot of experience to go on, anything over $30 is probably going to taste the same. And that’s OK! There are great inexpensive bottles out there. At a certain point wines hit a price cap and often get more expensive just based on the label. Don’t fall for it. I’ve had $30 bottles that were SO MUCH BETTER than a comparable $80 bottle. If buying at a grocery store or liquor store, decide your own personal price range and stick to it. 

But the first time a more expensive bottle blows your skirt up, you’ll remember. And that’s when you’ll know that your own personal price point just went up. I recommend you save those glorious moments for wine-tasting at a winery (not arbitrarily buying from the grocery store). The only time you really want to shell out for a bottle is for an old wine, or for “limited reserve” or “small lot” wines, which are bottles the winery has set aside based on their belief that they have achieved top quality, and can’t be mass produced. These bottles are almost always sold only at the winery. So if you are buying bottles at the winery, take the winemaker’s recommendation and don’t be afraid to splurge. But really the most important reason to buy any expensive bottle is always because you LOVE IT.

More delicious wine knowledge is coming. Stay tuned to Lust For Cooking.

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Homemade Stock: It’s HEALTHY and it’s FREE. Tips & Tricks for this Essential Ingredient.

Welcome to a new but crucial topic here at Lust for Cooking: Tips & Tricks. Otherwise known as The Basics or “How to Fish.”  You know the old adage, “Give a man a fish and he eats for a day, teach a man to fish and he eats for a lifetime.” This is where we will do our damnedest to show you “how to fish.” NOT literally. This isn’t a sporting blog. But “how to fish” in the kitchen. The real trick to loving cooking is knowing how food works. Then you become the master of your ingredients, and you can cook anything.

Important tip #1. HOMEMADE STOCK.

Why make your own stock? You can go to the grocery store and buy a box that’s exactly 4 cups. You can even get organic. So why bother?

Well, the sodium count for one thing. Holy criminy. The sodium content on some prepackaged stock and broth boxes is extraordinary. And don’t get us started on bullion. They have to add salt as a preservative so it can sit on the un-refrigerated grocery shelf. But you don’t have to add any to homemade stock. And really it doesn’t need it. Salt should only come in while seasoning the final product, such as soup or risotto, but if it’s already in the stock, chances are the final product will be overloaded.

The second reason is bones. Bone broth is soooooo good for you. The nutrients that come out of bones go a long way toward a healthy lifestyle. Chicken soup is known as a cure-all, not because of anything Campbell’s did, but because real bone broth will give a sick body the fortification it needs to fight off a cold. And really, do we trust these food processors to be giving us the most nutrient dense content? No. Not even a little.

And third, and possibly most importantly, it’s FREE. Yeah, you read that right. It’s free. It doesn’t cost anything. $0.00. Really. Why? It’s made completely from scraps. Things you would otherwise be throwing out. We at Lust for Cooking are big on preventing waste, and making your own stock, well, it kills two birds with one stone … or two fish…or whatever. You get the metaphor. So here’s how it works:

Bones

You need bones. Any bones, really. Chicken, pork, beef. Did you have a bone-in pork roast lately? How about some beef ribs for a BBQ? Chicken wings? Any and all roasted bones are what you need. Throw those bad boys in the freezer. They will keep for a very long time. And when you’re ready, they can go right from the freezer to the stock pot. For visual purposes, I’m using a chicken carcass left over from a roast chicken dinner. The meat was picked clean to use in enchiladas, and yes, it still has some garlic and lemon stuffed inside. It’s all good. Through it all in. Stock 4 IMG_0332

Veggie Scraps

Veggie scraps. Here is where you will find nuance. If you google “stock recipe,” it’s the veggies that vary from recipe to recipe. The standard formula is carrots, celery, onion. But honestly the secret is…. it doesn’t matter. What vegetables do you like? What do you eat often?  That’s what will work well in your stock. Here is the awesome hidden secret to stock-making. Freeze all of your veggie scraps.

At Lust for Cooking we keep a large Tupperware in the freezer that is usually overflowing with broccoli, cauliflower, and kale stems, onion scraps, bell pepper tops, carrot and Brussel sprout nubs, fennel fronds, apple cores, asparagus tips, mushroom and cilantro stems, and those obnoxious tiny garlic gloves in the middle of the bulb. These seemingly inedible portions are all still loaded with flavor.

In order to determine what to use, just keep in mind what your final product will be. If you’re going for tortilla soup, then the pepper tops are perfect. If you are looking for a sweet pork base, then apples cores are great. If you want a hearty vegetable broth, then mushrooms are your best friend.

Honestly, it’s hard to go wrong here. We at Lust for Cooking have never made the same stock twice. Just remember, you will almost always want to include those onion scraps and garlic cloves. Everything else is subjective. Experiment. Try different combos. Mushrooms = hearty. Kale stems = dark. Carrots = sweet. And so on.

Timing

For all types of stock, put all your ingredients in a big stock pot, fill it with water, bring it to a boil, then immediately lower the temperature to a gentle simmer. Then walk away. Really, that’s the gist. Any day you think you’ll be home for a few hours, it’s stock making time. (We don’t recommend leaving the house with the stove unattended, however, for safety’s sake.)  It’s especially easy with the frozen veggie scraps. No chopping necessary. How long do you simmer? Here are the basic guidelines for each type. But these are rough guidelines. When it tastes less like watery something-er-rather and more like wholesome deliciousness, it’s done:

Veggie stock- 2 hours

Chicken stock – 4 hours

Pork or beef stock – 6+ hours

Skimming

This is a valuable extra step, especially for bone stock. As your stock simmers, check out the surface. If there is a lot of foam or grease, grab a spoon and skim that off. Those are impurities from the bones. They’re not dangerous or anything, but they will cloudy up your stock and muddle the flavor. Better to remove them.

Stock 11 IMG_0339

Once the stock is done, pour it out through a fine sieve to catch all of your solids. You can even line the sieve with cheese cloth if you wish. Then let your stock cool. If you put it strait in the fridge, it could actually raise the temperature of your fridge and threaten to spoil the food inside. We usually put the bowl in the microwave to get it out of the way. Just don’t accidentally turn it on. Once it gets to  room temp, you can put it in the fridge. Once it is cool, a layer of fat will usually form at the top. This you can skim off once again for clarity. And that’s it! You’re done! You can now boast homemade stock!

Storing

Stock will keep for a very long time in the freezer and for about a about week in the fridge. You can use it at full strength or water it down.

Uses

Stock is so versatile and used in so many recipes that you will be stoked every time you open your fridge or freezer to find your very own homemade batch waiting for you. Use it as a base for soups, rice, risotto, and most sauces!

Keep on the lookout for more Tips & Tricks, or “How to Fish,” from Lust for Cooking.

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Zombieeeeees and Food: Don’t Be a Zombie. Eat Like a Human.

Entry #2 in our ongoing look at zombies and food: Destroying Civilization, or Why Cooking Makes Us Human

Welcome to our second installment on Zombieeeeeeeees and Food. In our first entry we looked at zombies as “mindless eaters,” or mindless eaters as “zombies,” either way. (To catch-up, mustard, click here.) Now we will look at the next portion of our established definition of zombie and why the heck it’s related to food.

As a reminder, zombies represent everything we at Lust for Cooking are against: mindless eaters who destroy civilization through (cannibalistic) over-consumption. Not sexy.

Zombies Destroy Civilization

Destroying civilization is bad. This statement seems obvious on the surface, but seriously, when you’re stuck in LA traffic or up to your eyeballs in debt, who hasn’t considered that maybe things would be better if someone just hit the reset button? That’s what makes Walking Dead so watchable, isn’t it? The “what if?”

But seriously, without some form of civilization, things go south fast. And no one really wants to spend his or her days fighting to survive. There are those alive today, in the real world, who do have to cope with the breakdown of their civilization either from poverty or war, and I bet they would be the first to tell you, it ain’t pretty.

Love it or hate it, civilization is the process by which we all get along, and food is an integral part of that. The ability for human beings to dine together (and not on each other) is the bedrock of human civilization.

Let us ‘splain. No, there is too much. Let us sum up…

Evolution. The ability to cook is now believed to be the reason humans evolved from primates. The theory is simple: cooking food means less time chewing on fibrous plants and more time thinking and communicating. Our jaw muscles grew smaller as our brains grew bigger. Exactly when humans managed to harness fire is unknown, but every mythology has an origin story about how we acquired fire. It’s that important. The moment we as a species sat down around a charred piece of meat we began to change. We were able to focus on each other, not on devouring enough calories to get by. For a great article on this, check out the Smithsonian.

Zombies can’t cook. They’re basically walking jaw muscles. They chew all day and don’t think at all. They have completely devolved back to their primordial state, well past primates. Eating for the sake of eating neglects what made us human in the first place. Thinking. Speaking. Socializing. It’s about coming to the table, which brings me to…

Violence. The development of table manners led directly to a less violent society. Seriously. Through the Middle Ages in Europe, people would eat with one utensil: a knife. That made the act of communal eating rather dangerous. One misunderstanding would lead to a battle of cutlery. In order to preserve the peace, knives were rounded, forks were invented, and a code of conduct was implemented to prevent misunderstandings. This is the same reason the Chinese use chopsticks, although they figured this out hundreds of years before the Europeans. Steven Pinker brings this up in his book The Better Angels of Our Nature: Why Violence Has Declined.

Zombies have no manners. Really, they’re gross. And I’m not saying you’re going to hell for eating ramen on the couch with your hands while a beer balances precariously on your thigh. Hey, we’ve all been there. Sometimes, that’s just how the day rolls. We’re not judging. What matters is taking some time to eat with others, cordially, even joyfully. Breaking bread and finding common ground. Countries and even religions have been founded on such acts.

Gluttony. It is commonly perceived that there is a correlation between gluttony and the fall of the Roman Empire (correlation, not causation, #science). While it is true that in the final age of Rome, Romans took indulgent eating to a whole new level, we’re not here to draw comparisons. Rome had all kinds of problems, and a propensity for overeating alone did not make the walls crumble. But it can certainly be said that when one class of people becomes excessively over-indulgent in feasting, there is probably another class of people going hungry. This kind of class disparity can cause major internal problems. Look at the French Revolution. Gluttony at the expense of the hungry never ends well. Wars are often fought over bread.

Zombies are gluttons. This is categorical. They devour until there is nothing left. As mentioned in our previous installment, preparing one’s own food can radically help control common problems in the American diet such as waste and overeating. But the real issue is that many still go hungry, and finding ways to bring food to those in need is humanity at its finest. For more on this, check out our “Champions” category.

Don’t be a zombie. Eat like a human. Our goal at Lust for Cooking is to invert the definition of a zombie. Destroying Civilization becomes Creating Society.

Remember the zombie isn’t just destructive. It’s also dead. For reals dead. And death is usually the consequence of destroying civilization. Hey, zombies make more zombies.

Featured image provided by pixabay.com

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Eat Like Shakespeare

On this, the 400th anniversary of Shakespeare’s death (and interestingly also the 452 anniversary of his baptism), we at Lust for Cooking would like to celebrate the life of the Bard by directing you to a very unusual cook book, Shakespeare’s Kitchen: Renaissance Recipes for the Contemporary Cook, by Francine Segan.

Not only will you be shown how to make traditional Renaissance era recipes, likely eaten by the great wordsmith himself, but Segan also goes the extra mile to include the original Elizabethan recipes. Behold:

“Take some cabbedge and pricke & wash then cleane, and perboyle then in faire water, then put them into a collender, and let water run from them cleane, then put them into a faire earthen pot, and as much sweete broth as will cover the cabbadge, and sweete butter, then take your Mallard and rost it halfe enough, and save the drippings of him, then cut him in the side, and put the mallard into the cabbedge, and put in all your drippings, then let it stew an houre, and season it with salt, and serve it upon soppes.:

THE GOOD HUSWIFES JEWELL, 1587

This is from the entry, “Cabbages with Smoked Duck.” Don’t worry, the recipes are also written in plain, contemporary English with periods and all.

And remember, “’tis an ill cook that cannot lick his own fingers.” –ROMEO AND JULIET

So lick away.

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The Grocery Challenge

So in your wanderings of the Internet, somewhere between work and life, you may have come across a post filled with pictures that looked something like this:

Hungry Planet
Norway: The Glad Ostensen family in Gjerdrum. Food expenditure for one week: $731.71.

This photograph is part of a large and fascinating project put together by Peter Menzel and Faith D’Aluisio, in which they traveled the globe to photograph a diverse cross-section of the world’s eaters. All of the photographs, along with some very interesting commentary, can be found in the book Hungry Planet, but more on that to come.

Here at Lust for Cooking, we decided to take this project to heart LFC logo 1 copy. Inspired by the work of Menzel and D’Aluisio, we thought, “What if we photographed our own grocery haul for the week?  What would we reveal? What would we learn?”

It is no small task to display the contents of one’s grocery bag to the world. We found it to be a rather personal display of our eating habits, our food budget, and our impulse buys. It also forced us to take a hard look at what we plan to put in our mouths over the course of the week. As bloggers for the joy, lust, and world-changing effects of cooking, photographing our weekly groceries really makes us put our money where our mouths are (works on so many levels).

But since intimacy is one of our M.O.’s here at Lust for Cooking, we rose to the challenge:

LFC Groceries

This food was purchased with a strict weekly budget of $150.00 and includes not only dinners but planned leftovers for lunch and our alcohol intake (now you see why this can get so personal). Some may find this number very low and some may find this high. As Hungry Planet points out, a family’s food budget is relative to many factors, particularly location.

Granted, you don’t see us in the picture. Just imagine two typical, slightly pudgy, but adorable Americans.  🙂

So the question is, who else is willing to take this challenge? What will you learn about yourself?

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